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Getting around Cologne

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Nightlife

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Thursday, 23.10.2014
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Shopping in Cologne

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Good to know
City map Cologne
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    Cologne – a brief overview

    Cologne has a big, big history. Germany’s western metropolis spent centuries overshadowing both Berlin and Munich, and its medieval-era importance has left it with an amazing array of museums, galleries and period architecture – not least, of course, its world-famous cathedral, which still dominates the skyline.

    Today it remains one of the most significant cities in the country, with an arts scene to rival the capital, a famously fun-loving spirit and a population of more than a million people. For lovers of festivals, food, culture or history – or ideally all four – it’s one of Europe’s great city breaks.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Top 10 sights in Cologne
    ListMap
    Köln, Dom, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Travel Guide

    Cologne Cathedral

    Domkloster 4
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 1794 0530
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0600-2100 (May-Oct)
    0600-1930 (Nov-Apr)

    The most famous and awe-inspiring of all of Germany’s religious buildings, the city’s cathedral (or, in German, Dom) has stood here in various forms for close to 800 years. Its twin spires are more than 150m (492ft) in height.

    Römisch-Germanisches Museum

    Roncalliplatz 4
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 2212 4438
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tues-Sun 1000-1700
    (first Thurs of the month 1000-2200)

    Focusing on the city’s considerable Roman heritage, this museum is best known for exhibiting a third-century mosaic that was discovered by chance in the 1940s. It’s an evocative place to wander through.

    Museum Ludwig

    Heinrich-Böll-Platz
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 2212 6165
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tues-Sun 1000-1800
    (first Thurs of the month 1000-2200)

    Boasting works from the likes of Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, David Hockney and Roy Lichtenstein, this modern art gallery occupies an eye-catching building with a rippling roof. It also contains works by prominent German expressionists.

    Cologne Cable Car

    Riehler Strasse 180
    50735 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 547 4184
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 1000-1800
    (late Mar to early Nov)

    Crossing the Rhine from up on high, this long-established cable car is an enjoyable way of adding a different flavour to a city break – particularly if kids are involved.

    Wallraf-Richartz Museum & Fondation Corboud

    Obenmarspforten 40
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 2212 1119
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tues-Wed and Fri-Sun 1000-1800
    Thurs 1000-2100
    (first Thurs of the month 1000-2200)

    Another high-quality art museum, the attraction leads visitors on a display of art through the ages, from medieval works produced here in Cologne to European art from the 20th century.

    Phantasialand

    Berggeiststraße 31-41
    50321 Brühl
    Germany
    Tel: 01806 366 200
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0900-1800 (Apr-Oct)
    1100-2000 (late Nov-early Jan)

    Located just south of the city in Brühl, this is one of Germany’s oldest theme parks and remains a good bet for keeping kids entertained with roller coasters, theatres and other attractions.

    Cologne City Museum

    Zeughausstraße1-3
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 2212 5789
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tues 1000-2000
    Wed-Sun 1000-1700
    (first Thurs of the month 1000-2200)

    A recommended port of call for visitors with a specific interest in the long and absorbing story of Cologne itself, spanning from the Middle Ages to the modern day.

    Chocolate Museum

    Am Schokoladenmuseum 1A
    50678 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 931 8880
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Fri 1000-1800
    Sat-Sun 1100-1900

    You don’t need to be a lover of the dark stuff to enjoy a visit here – but it certainly helps. The museum covers the history and production of chocolate, and has become one of Cologne’s best-known attractions.

    Fragrance Museum Farina-House

    Obenmarspforten 21
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 399 8994
    Show on map

    Opening times
    Mon-Sat 1000-1900
    Sun 1000-1600

    Ever wondered how “Eau de Cologne” got its name? This museum gives an overview of the production and popularity of fragrances over the centuries – a fascinating story.

    Kolumba

    Kolumbastraße 4
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: (0221) 933 1930
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Wed-Mon 1200-1700

    An art museum run by the city’s archdiocese, Kolumba offers a far-from-dry collection of spiritual art, showcasing beautiful works in a beautiful building.

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    Good to know
    Country Information

    Country overview

    Still misunderstood by many, Germany stands as one of the most endlessly engaging countries on the continent. Anyone expecting a homogenous nation conforming to rigid Teutonic stereotypes is in for a shock. As a travel destination it’s somewhere with huge personality, notable for a clutch of truly lovable cities, culture served up in hefty portions and rural scenery so heart-melting you’ll be left bemused why some people still think of the place as lacking allure.

    It’s the country’s urban highlights that tend to draw the attention first. Berlin is the very definition of a dynamic city, having forged a goodtime reputation for ground-breaking creativity while still keeping sight of it’s past. Elsewhere, the likes of Cologne, Munich and Hamburg are rich in historical buildings, eyes-to-the-future nightlife and excellent gastronomy.

    Geography

    Germany borders Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Poland and Switzerland. The northwest has a coastline on the North Sea while the Baltic coastline in the northeast stretches from the Danish to the Polish border.

    The country is divided into 16 states (Bundesländer) and has an exceedingly varied landscape. In what was once known as West Germany, the Rhine, Bavaria and the Black Forest stand as the three most famous features, while in the east, the country is lake-studded with undulating lowlands.

    River basins extend over a large percentage of the region, and some of Europe’s most prominent rivers flow through the country. These include the Elbe, the Danube and the Rhine.

    The highest point in the country is the 2,962m (9,718ft) peak of Zugspitze Mountain in the Bavarian Alps. Cable cars run to the summit – it can also be climbed.

    General Information

    Key facts

    Population: 81.147.265

    Population Density (per sq km): 227

    Capital: Berlin.

    Language

    German is the official language. Regional dialects often differ markedly from standard German. Minority languages include Danish and Sorbic, while some English and French is also spoken.

    Currency

    Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 cents.

    Electricity

    230 volts AC, 50Hz. European-style round two-pin plugs are in use.

    General business opening hours

    Mon-Fri 0800-1600 (many close earlier on Fridays).

    Public holidays

    Below are listed Public Holidays for the January 2014-December 2015 period.
    Note: Regional observation only.

    2014

    New Year’s Day: 01. January 2014
    Epiphany: 06. January 2014
    Good Friday: 18. April 2014
    Easter Monday: 21. April 2014
    Labour Day: 01. May 2014
    Ascension Day: 29. May 2014
    Whit Monday: 09. June 2014
    Corpus Christi: 19. June 2014
    Assumption: 15. August 2014
    Day of German Unity: 03. October 2014
    Day of Reformation: 25. October 2014
    All Saints’ Day: 01. November 2014
    Repentance Day: 19. November 2014
    Christmas Day: 25. December 2014

    2015

    New Year’s Day: 01. January 2015
    Epiphany: 06. January 2015
    Good Friday: 03. April 2015
    Easter Monday: 06. April 2015
    Labour Day: 01. May 2015
    Ascension Day: 14. May 2015
    Whit Monday: 25. May 2015
    Corpus Christi: 04. June 2015
    Assumption: 15. August 2015
    Day of German Unity: 03. October 2015
    Day of Reformation: 31. October 2015
    All Saints’ Day: 01. November 2015
    Repentance Day: 18. November 2015
    Christmas Day: 25. December 2015

    Flight and accommodation

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    Getting around

    Public Transport

    The city has an extensive bus and tram network, with various tickets on offer allowing visitors to get good value from their time here – the Cologne Welcome Card, for example, allows use of public transport for 24 hours and also grants discounts at local attractions. To cross the Rhine in memorable fashion, there’s a cable car that’s been running for more than 50 years.

    Taxis

    Taxis aren’t hard to come by in Cologne – both in ranks and cruising the streets – and it doesn’t generally take long to hail one. Good companies to call include Taxi RUF Köln (tel: (0221) 2882).

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    Nightlife in Cologne
    ListMap

    Running the full spectrum from slick bar to jostling Bräuhaus, Cologne’s nightlife also offers up some quality cultural venues.

    Running the full spectrum from slick bar to jostling Bräuhaus, Cologne’s nightlife also offers up some quality cultural venues.

    Cölner Hofbräu Früh

    Am Hof 12-18
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    You’ll get a beery blast of traditional Cologne at this busy Old Town brewery.

    Papa Joe’s

    Alter Markt 50-52
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Billed as Germany’s oldest jazz venue, with free live music every evening; there’s food on offer too, if you want to make a night of it.

    Schauspiel Köln

    Schanzenstrasse 6-20
    51063 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    One of the city’s leading theatre and arts venues, with a diverse roster of events ranging from ballet to film.

    Club Diamonds

    Hohenzollernring 90
    50672 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    A glitzy and plush but enjoyable nightclub, mainly aimed at a young crowd.

    E-Werk

    Schanzenstrasse 36
    51063 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Once a power station, this live music venue draws big names on a regular basis and has welcomed artists of the calibre of David Bowie and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

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    Restaurants in Cologne
    ListMap

    Cologne is a very good place to sample traditional German fare – usually washed down with a glass or two of Kölsch, the famous local beer – but it gives a vast amount of other choice, from the cheap and cheerful to the über-refined.

    Cologne is a very good place to sample traditional German fare – usually washed down with a glass or two of Kölsch, the famous local beer – but it gives a vast amount of other choice, from the cheap and cheerful to the über-refined.

    Restaurant Konrad

    Marzellenstraße 13-17
    50668 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    Offering a stylish contemporary take on German food, located in the Hilton hotel.

    Hanse Stube

    Trankgasse 1-5
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    The signature restaurant at the Excelsior Hotel Ernst, with the inventive quality of cuisine that this would suggest.

    Bulgogi Haus

    Neusser Straße 654
    50737 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    A very good Korean restaurant, offering an attractive option for those looking for something different.

    Bei Oma Kleinmann

    Zülpicher Straße 9
    50674 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    A thoroughly likeable local restaurant, famed for its enormous schnitzels.

    Lommerzheim

    Siegesstraße 18
    50679 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    No-frills traditional fare; its huge popularity with locals tells its own story.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Calendar of events

    Cologne Marathon

    14 September 2014
    Website

    Venue: Streets of Cologne.

    Like any self-respecting city these days, Cologne has its own marathon route. Over 27,000 participants pound the streets each year as they rack up their self-inflicted quota of 41.9 kilometres (26.22 miles.) It’s the third most popular marathon in Germany (the other two taking place in Hamburg and Berlin) so there’s something of an atmosphere in the air. Plus, as a spectator, there’s a good chance of catching sight some world-class athletes in action.

    Kunstsalon – Musik in der Häusern der Stadt

    4 – 9 November 2014
    Website

    Venue: Throughout the city.

    This cool music festival takes its inspiration from a simple yet effective formula: to let private hosts provide platforms for young and emerging artists to express themselves by performing in private venues. Coordinated across Cologne, Hamburg, Bonn, Mannheim and beyond, the annual festival creates an intimate atmosphere for appreciating new music as well as drawing the cities together.

    Lange Nacht der Kölner Museen

    8 November 2014
    Website

    Venue: Across the museums of Cologne.

    Lange Nacht der Kölner Museen, (Long Night of the Cologne Museums), takes place each November and involves a coordinated throwing open of doors of the city’s museums. Between 7pm and 3am, up to 45 different museums welcome in every kind of night owl while putting on a show that involves live music, tours, readings and films. Even better: you only need a single ticket to access all that’s on offer.

    Weihnachtsmärkte (Christmas Markets)

    24 November – 23 December 2014
    Website

    Venue: Around the centre of Cologne.

    Six markets offering food, drink and crafts plus events and Advent boat trips.

    Carnival Cologne

    12 – 18 February 2015
    Website

    Venue: Streets of Cologne.

    One of the biggest events on the calendar, carnival sweeps across the city each year as a vibrant display of how to have a good time. Expect lots of fancy dress, plenty of parties, parades and not an awful lot of sobriety. There’s ceremonial burning of straw figures, bouquets of flowers and cries of “Kölle Alaaf”. (‘Long Live Cologne!’).

    Romanische Sommer

    20 – 29 June 2015
    Website

    Venue: Romanesque churches across Cologne.

    Cologne has some of the finest Romanesque churches in the world and every couple of years they gather together to produce a summer festival of music performed at a variety of different churches. Expect a range of classical music, from string quartets to organ concertos and both solo and choral singing events. Piano recitals also feature, as do explorations of Chinese music.

    Cologne Pride/Christopher Street Day

    22 June – 7 July 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues and locations.

    Hundreds of thousands of revellers pack the city streets for the annual Cologne Pride/Christopher Street Day parade. One of the largest gay and lesbian events in Germany, the celebration aims to raise awareness and social acceptance of lesbians, gays, bi- and transsexuals. The main event is the huge parade consisting of dancers, floats and sounds systems that makes its way through the city’s streets. Other events take place throughout the city during the weekend. The event now attracts about a million visitors each year.

    SummerJam

    5 – 7 July 2015
    Website

    Venue: Fuhlinger lake, , Fuhlinger See.

    For three days revellers can get down to the bass-heavy sounds of reggae music at the largest event of its kind in the country. Performances take place on different stages at the festival site on an island on Fuhlinger lake on the outskirts of Cologne. This fun event attracts some of the biggest names in reggae – past performers have included Asian Dub Foundation, Gregory Isaacs, Toots and the Maytals, Jimmy Cliff and Ziggy Marley.

    Kölner Lichter Musical Fireworks

    11 July 2015
    Website

    Venue: Above Cologne’s Old Town.

    For a bit of razzle-dazzle, head to Cologne in the summer to witness its extravagant firework display called Kölner Lichter. Watch from the river banks or from the river itself as the sky over Cologne’s Old Town lights up to the sound of music as the evening progresses.

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    Hotels in Cologne
    ListMap

    Cologne has a huge roster of different hotels for various budgets, but be aware that peak seasons – or major events like trade fairs – can see prices rise.

    There are lots of good options in the Altstadt (Old Town), but it can pay to look elsewhere.

    Excelsior Hotel Ernst

    Trankgasse 1-5
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Tel: +49 221 2701
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    A luxurious grand dame on Cologne’s hotel scene, sitting opposite the cathedral since the 1860s.

    Hyatt Regency Cologne

    Kennedy-Ufer 2A
    50679 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    Expect top-tier, business-friendly luxury at this five-star hotel on the Rhine.

    Hotel Ariane

    Hohe Pforte 19-21
    50676 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    A three-star option within straightforward reach of the main sights.

    Das Kleine Stapelhäuschen

    Fischmarkt 1-3
    50667 Cologne
    Germany
    Show on map

    Category: Cheap

    A small, well-priced option in a restored medieval house.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know
    Best time to visit

    Today: Thursday, 23.10.2014 16:00

    overcast

    temperature


    10°C


    50°F

    wind direction

    south

    wind speed

    4.375 mph

    humidity

    87%

    7 days forecast

    Friday

    24.10.2014

    15°C / 8°C

    59°F / 46°F

    Saturday

    25.10.2014

    14°C / 8°C

    57°F / 46°F

    Sunday

    26.10.2014

    15°C / 7°C

    59°F / 45°F

    Monday

    27.10.2014

    16°C / 8°C

    61°F / 46°F

    Tuesday

    28.10.2014

    17°C / 8°C

    63°F / 46°F

    Wednesday

    29.10.2014

    14°C / 5°C

    57°F / 41°F

    Thursday

    30.10.2014

    10°C / 1°C

    50°F / 34°F

    Climate and best time to visit Cologne

    May to September is the most popular time of year to come calling, with the allure of the summer months pushing up accommodation prices – the city’s beer gardens are at their best in the sunshine, but if you come calling in spring or autumn then the drop in visitor numbers has its own rewards. For those in search of specific events or festivals, the week-long Carnival is a street party of epic proportions taking place in the days running up to Ash Wednesday, while the city’s Christmas markets are renowned as being among the best in Germany.

    Climate & best time to visit Germany

    As with most European countries, Germany is a year-round destination but not especially dependable weather-wise. In general terms though, it’s temperate throughout the country with warm summers and cold winters – prolonged periods of frost or snow are rare. Rain falls throughout the year, with much of Germany experiencing its maximum rainfall over the high summer months. Unpredictability, then, is a major factor. The average January daytime temperature is 3°C (38°F) and in July is 22°C (72°F). Extremes commonly reach -10°C (5°F) in winter and 35°C (95°F) in the summer months.

    While Munich might be considerably further south than Berlin, the fact that the Bavarian capital sits at a much higher altitude means the two cities have broadly comparable summers. The highest annual temperatures tend to be in the southwest, where there’s almost a Mediterranean feel to the landscape at times. Unsurprisingly, this is where much of Germany’s wine is grown.

    May through to September are the most popular months in terms of tourist numbers, and certainly hold the most appeal for visitors aiming to spend significant periods of time outdoors. However, the spring and autumn shoulder seasons also hold real attraction for those who want the promise of decent(ish) weather without the tourist levels. The winter holidays are also a big draw in their way, due in no small part to their attendant Christmas markets. Peak season for ski areas is from December through to the end of March.

    Away from the mountains, January through to April will appeal to those who enjoy the benefits of uncrowded attractions, although be aware that cities like Berlin rarely witness "slow" periods at any time of year. Prices tend to be slightly higher over the summer months. One other thing to bear in mind is that hotel rates can increase when large trade shows are in town (potentially a problem in Frankfurt, for example).

    Flight and accommodation

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    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone/Mobile Telephone

    Dialing Code: +49

    Telephone

    Local and international calls can be made from phone boxes in towns and cities. These usually accept both coins and pre-paid cards (available at post offices and other outlets). In larger cities, you’ll often be able to make international calls from internet cafes too.

    Mobile Telephone

    Roaming agreements exist with many international mobile phone companies. Coverage is good. It is illegal to use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving. If you’re going to be in Germany for a long period of time, consider obtaining a local SIM card.

    Internet

    Internet is readily available; there are many Internet cafes all over the country. Large Internet access centres exist in most main cities. Most hotels also provide facilities, either included in the room rate or charged separately.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Shopping in Cologne
    Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

    Key Areas

    The city’s most obvious shopping streets are Schildergasse and nearby Hohe Straße, both of which sit in the centre of town and offer the expected range of goods and services. For something a little more specialist, Ehrenstraße has a number of young arty boutiques, while Mittelstraße plays home to numerous luxury brands.

    Markets

    The city’s Christmas markets are rightly famed (for their food and drink as well as their arts and crafts), with the stalls outside the cathedral representing the most naturally picturesque option. At other times of year, there’s a good flea market in the Neumarkt area, usually monthly, and an enjoyable Saturday food market on Wilhelmplatz.

    Shopping Centres

    The best-known shopping centre in town – and one of the oldest of its kind in Germany – is the well-located Galeria Kaufhof (Hohe Straße 41), while elsewhere the Rhein Center (Aachener Straße 1253) is a good bet for clothes and fashion items.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know
    Traveller etiquette

    Handshaking is customary, and it is considered rude to address people by their first name unless invited to do so. Normal courtesies should be observed. Before eating, it is normal to say “guten Appetit” to the other people at the table to which the correct reply is “danke, gleichfalls” (“Thank you, the same to you”). If you’ve been invited to eat at a German house, it is customary to present the hostess with unwrapped flowers (according to tradition, you should always give an uneven number, and it is worth noting that red roses are exclusively a lover’s gift).

    In shops and other businesses, courtesy dictates that visitors should utter a greeting such as “guten tag”

    (or “grüss gott” in Bavaria) before saying what it is that they want; to leave without saying “auf wiedersehen” or “tschüss” can also cause offence.

    Similarly, when making a telephone call, asking for the person you want to speak to without stating first who you are is impolite. Casual wear is widely acceptable, but more formal dress is required for some restaurants, the opera, theatre, casinos and important social functions. Smoking is prohibited where notified and on public transport and in most public buildings.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Health

    Main emergency number: 112

    Food & Drink

    There’s nothing to mark out German produce as particularly risky to general health (although it has a partly founded reputation for being fatty). Tap water is safe to drink.

    Other Risks

    Tick-borne encephalitis is present in forested areas of southern Germany; vaccination is advisable. Rabies is present; look out for ‘Tollwut’ signs. For those at high risk, vaccination before arrival should be considered.

    During the summer months, sunburn can be a problem. The southwest generally draws the highest temperatures. The usual precautions apply: use a generous amount of sunscreen and be sensible about how long you spend in direct sunlight. Be aware that a breezy day can sometimes mask high temperatures.

    If walking over a long distance in warm weather, it’s advisable to drink – and carry – plenty of water and wear appropriate clothing, including a sun hat. Blisters can be another problem for hikers. These can often occur if new walking shoes are being worn across a long distance. Ideally footwear should be worn in before the trip.

    As a counterpoint to the balminess of the summer, German winters can be fairly severe. This is generally truer the further east you travel. If you’re arriving during the coldest months of the year, ensure you have adequate clothing. At any time of year, in fact, temperatures can be unpredictable – even in July and August, it makes sense to have a sweater (and maybe a brolly too) to hand.

    Other health problems that inexperienced travellers might reasonably encounter are the various knock-on effects of too much alcohol consumption. The risk, unsurprisingly, is particularly prevalent among those attending Munich’s Oktoberfest. Be aware that some beer’s ABV levels can be 6 or 7%, so should be treated with respect.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Walter Dr. Heimbach
    Von-Sandt-Platz 10 (Deutz)
    D-50679 Köln
    Germany
    Tel. +49-221-813392

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.

    Flight and accommodation

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