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City map Hong Kong

Points of interest: Your selected categories
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    Good to know

    Organized chaos

    Crowded, overwhelming, intoxicating: all apply to Hong Kong. A thicket of skyscrapers set against a jade-green sea and the odd rural village, and flanked by mountains, China’s cosmopolitan powerhouse is a place of jarring contradictions.

    At the same time, it’s a brilliant place to shop, it boasts incredible places to eat, among them the world’s cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant, and it dissolves into organised, neon-lit chaos come nightfall. A visit to Hong Kong is one you certainly won’t forget in a hurry.

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    Discover

    Top 10 sights in Hong Kong

    ListMap
    Hongkong, China, Buddha, Buddhismus

    Victoria Peak

    The Peak, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Tel: 2522 0922
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0700-0000

    Towering 552m (1,811ft) above the city, Victoria Peak was once the seat of British power in Hong Kong but now hosts a mini mall with an observation deck from which you can see most of the city.

    Po Lin Monastery

    Ngong Ping, Lantua Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Tel: 2985 5248
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0800-1800

    Home to the world’s largest seated Buddha, Lantau Island’s Po Lin Monastery is situated within a culture-themed tourist village and is close to the Ngong Ping cable car.

    Avenue of Stars

    Promenade, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Hong Kong is the hub of the Asian film industry and as a result, has its very own walk of fame. Along with celebrity hand prints, there’s also a life-size bronze of Bruce Lee.

    Man Mo Temple

    124-126 Hollywood Road, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Tel: 2540 0350
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0800-1800

    Set in the heart of Hong Kong’s cool financial district, the wood and stone Man Mo Temple was built in 1847 and is dedicated to the gods of war and literature.

    Shek O

    Shek O, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    For a glimpse of Hong Kong as it used to be, a trip to the fishing village of Shek O on the eastern end of Hong Kong Island is essential. A whitewashed cluster of flower-covered homes, it also boasts a stunning white sandy beach.

    Hong Kong Museum of History

    100 Chatham Road South, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Tel: 2724 9042
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon and Wed-Fri 1000-1800
    Sat-Sun 1000-1900

    A whistle-stop tour of Hong Kong history; beginning with the Devonian period and ending with the city’s transfer to Chinese rule in 1997.

    Victoria Harbour

    Victoria Harbour
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Hong Kong’s central harbour is a hive of activities at all times of day with everything from ferries to red-sailed junks plying its waters.

    Ladies’ Market

    Tung Choi Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily, usually until midnight

    You don’t have to be female to appreciate this 1km stretch of colourful stalls selling every type of women’s clothing imaginable. Homeware and cosmetics are also available.

    Hong Kong Museum of Coastal Defence

    175 Tung Hei Road, Shau Kei Wan
    Hong Kong
    China
    Tel: 2569 1500
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Fri-Wed 1000-1800 (Mar-Sep)
    Fri-Wed 1000-1700 (Oct-Feb)

    Housed inside an old British fort, the Hong Kong Museum of Coastal Defence boasts superb views of Victoria Harbour as well as a historical nature trail and a quirky selection of maritime artefacts.

    Hong Kong Space Museum

    10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Tel: 2721 0226
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon and Wed-Fri 1300-2100
    Sat-Sun 1000-2100

    Set within a futuristic egg-shaped building, the Hong Kong Space Museum is home to the city’s planetarium as well as extensive exhibits covering everything from space travel to life on Mars.

    Good to know

    Country information

    Country overview

    Colossal, dizzying and fiercely, endlessly foreign, China is a destination not easily compared to anywhere else on the planet. Home to approximately one fifth of the human race, China variously dazzles, befuddles, frustrates and thrills. The key visitor attractions are renowned around the globe – think the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, and the Terracotta Warriors –

    but on the ground it’s the sheer scale and off-kilter energy of the place that leave the most lasting impression. China’s landscapes unfurl dramatically across the map, its customs are as fascinating as they are numerous, and its sights, sounds and infinite oddities altogether amount to one of the world’s truly great travel experiences.

    Geography

    China is bordered to the north by Russia and Mongolia; to the east by Korea (Dem Rep), the Yellow Sea and the South China Sea; to the south by Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, India, Bhutan and Nepal; and to the west by India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. China has a varied terrain ranging from high plateaux in the west to flatlands in the east; mountains take up almost one-third of the land.

    The most notable high mountain ranges are the Himalayas, the Altai Mountains, the Tian Shan Mountains and the Kunlun Mountains.

    On the border with Nepal is the 8,848m (29,198ft) Mount Qomolangma (Mount Everest). In the west is the Qinghai/Tibet Plateau, with an average elevation of 4,000m (13,200ft), known as ‘the Roof of the World’. At the base of the Tian Shan Mountains is the Turpan Depression or Basin, China’s lowest area, 154m (508ft) below sea level at the lowest point. China has many great river systems, notably the Yellow (Huang He) and Yangtze River (Chang Jiang, also Yangtze Kiang). Only 10% of all China is suitable for agriculture.

    General knowledge

    Key facts

    Population: 1349585838

    Population Density (per sq km): 140

    Capital: Beijing.

    Language

    The official language is Mandarin Chinese. Among the enormous number of local dialects, large groups speak Cantonese, Shanghaiese (also known as Shanghainese), Fuzhou, Hokkien-Taiwanese, Xiang, Gan and Hakka dialects in the south. Inner Mongolia, Tibet and Xinjiang, which are autonomous regions, have their own languages. Translation and interpreter services are good. English is spoken by many guides and in hotels. Many taxi drivers do not speak English, even in big cities.

    Currency

    1 Renminbi Yuan (CNY; symbol ¥) = 10 jiao/mao or 100 fen. Notes are in denominations of ¥100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 1, 5 jiao and 1 jiao. Coins are in denominations of ¥1, 5 jiao and 1 jiao. Counterfeit ¥50 and ¥100 notes are commonplace. The Yuan is often referred to as the ‘guai’ in street slang.

    Electricity

    220 volts AC, 50Hz. Two-pin and three-pin sockets are generally in use. However, most 4- to 5-star hotels are also wired for 110-volt appliances.

    General business opening hours

    Mon-Fri 0900-1800, midday break of one hour.

    Public holidays

    Below are listed Public Holidays for the January 2014-December 2015 period.
    Note: In addition to the Public Holidays listed, other holidays may be observed locally and certain groups have official Public Holidays on the following dates:

    8 Mar
    International Women’s Day.
    4 May National Youth Day.
    23 May Tibet Liberation Day.
    1 Jun International Children’s Day.
    1 Aug Army Day.

    2014

    New Year’s Day: 01. January 2014
    Spring Festival (Chinese New Year): 30. January 2014
    Qingming Festival: 04. April 2014
    Labour Day: 01. May 2014
    Dragon Boat Festival: 02. June 2014
    Mid-Autumn Festival: 08. September 2014
    National Day: 01. October 2014

    2015

    New Year’s Day: 01. January 2015
    Spring Festival (Chinese New Year): 19. February 2015
    Qingming Festival: 05. April 2015
    Labour Day: 29. April 2015
    Dragon Boat Festival: 20. June 2015
    Mid-Autumn Festival: 27. September 2015
    National Day: 01. October 2015

    Enjoy

    Nightlife in Hong Kong

    ListMap

    The Old Town, with its seemingly endless selection of pubs and bars, is where most of the action happens although you are likely to run into a stag do or two.

    Also worth checking out is the city centre where cigar bars and chic wine spots abound.

    Aqua Luna

    Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Hong Kong’s iconic red junk is the best spot for seeing the Symphony of Light while sipping a glass of red.

    Club 71

    67 Hollywood Road, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Cosy and relaxed, Club 71 is an expat’s bar that attracts an eclectic crowd.

    The Globe

    Garley Building, 45-53 Graham Street, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    A comfortable wood-panelled drinking spot with a good selection of beers.

    The BlckBrd

    8 Lyndhurst Terrace, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    A gorgeous timbered terrace and a chic clientele make this a must-visit.

    Hooray Bar

    World Trade Center, 280 Gloucester Road, Causeway Bay
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Ignore the silly name; this rooftop bar boasts incredible views and equally good cocktails.

    Enjoy

    Restaurants in Hong Kong

    ListMap

    Eating in Hong Kong is an unadulterated pleasure and there’s a dizzying array of restaurants, many of which are affordable, to choose from.

    Dim sum is a local favourite and well worth trying out, while the weirder elements of Chinese cuisine aren’t too prevalent.

    Red Almond

    Hysan Place, 500 Hennessy Road, Causeway Bay
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    Spicy Sichuan food served at the top of a shopping centre with views over the harbour.

    Tim’s Kitchen

    84-90 Bonham Strand, Sheung Wan
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    One of Hong Kong’s chicest eating spots, Tim’s Kitchen’s Cantonese food has two Michelin stars.

    Sushi Kuu

    Wellington Place, 2-8 Wellington Street
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    Amazing Japanese cuisine with quirky extras such as slow-cooked eggs.

    Luk Yu Teahouse

    24-26 Stanley Street, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    An old-fashioned dining spot that specialises in Chinese classics.

    Tim Ho Wan

    2-20 Kwong Wa Street, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    The world’s cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant serves up dim sum to die for.

    Discover

    Calendar of events

    Mid-Autumn Festival

    27 September 2014

    Venue: Throughout the city.

    Also known as the Moon Cake Festival, after the sweet treats which are eaten during the run-up and on the day itself. The festival marks a historical rebellion against Mongol rule in which, it is said, plans for revolt were hidden within moon cakes. Events include a lantern parade in Victoria Park.

    Chinese New Year

    19 February 2015

    Venue: Throughout Hong Kong.

    The biggest event of the year for most Chinese residents, with a two week build-up to a day of dragon dances and fireworks. It’s a family event, with visits to temples and – perhaps most important of all – feasting on New Year delicacies such as crescent-shaped dumplings (which symbolise wealth).

    Hong Kong Arts Festival

    27 February – 29 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Throughout the city.

    A celebration of all things performing arts. There are live performances and artistic events, including music, dance and drama. This is a truly international arts festival which has seen top artists from around the world. Live performances and artistic events, including music, dance and drama. This is a truly international arts festival which has seen top artists from around the world. Previous participants include: Moscow Art Theatre, Paris Opera Ballet, the People’s Art Theatre of Beijing, Pina Bausch Tanztheater Wuppertal, the Royal Shakespeare Company, Stuttgart Ballet and the Bolshoi Theatre amongst others.

    Spring Lantern Festival

    5 March 2015

    Venue: Throughout the city.

    Also known as Chinese Valentine’s Day. Expect lantern parades and matchmaking games.

    Summer International Film Festival

    12 – 26 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues.

    The Hong Kong International Film Festival is one of Asia’s most reputable film festivals. The event reaches over 600,000 individuals, screening over 330 films from over 50 countries. Festival-goers can enjoy world-class films, seminars hosted by film makers from around the world. exhibitions, parties and more.

    Ching Ming Festival

    4 April 2015

    Venue: Throughout Hong Kong.

    On ‘grave sweeping day’, families visit the graves of loved ones and tidy them up. They also burn ‘hell money’ which is intended to give the deceased spending power in the afterlife; similarly burning status symbols such as paper cars will equip the departed with luxury goods.

    Le French GourMay

    1 – 31 May 2015
    Website

    Venue: Hong Kong

    Le French GourMay will allows the people of Hong Kong and Macau to satisfy their craving for the best of French wines and gastronomy. Restaurants, Michelin-starred chefs, as well as wine importers and distributors in Hong Kong and Macau advocate the festival by featuring menus to go along with French wines, wine tastings, promotions and workshops.

    Cheung Chau Bun Festival

    25 May 2015

    Venue: Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island.

    This week of festivities – also known as the Tai Chiu festival – includes parades, martial arts demonstrations and Chinese opera performances. But it’s the buns which really capture the imagination: towers of them are intended to satisfy the ghosts of pirates, and on the final day a huge tower of buns is scaled by teams competing to grab as many of them as possible.

    Dragon Boat Festival

    20 June 2015

    Venue: Various locations across Hong Kong including Aberdeen, Stanley, Discovery Bay, and Sai Kung.

    Dragon boat racing, as well as live entertainment, food stalls and a vibrant party atmosphere take over Hong Kong during the Dragon Boat Festival. This ancient event, also known as Tuen Ng Festival, commemorates the death of a popular Chinese national hero, Qu Yuan, who drowned himself in the Mi Lo River over 2,000 years ago to protest against the corrupt rulers.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Enjoy

    Hotels in Hong Kong

    ListMap

    Compared to other Asian cities, Hong Kong is expensive.

    Regardless, this is a good place to come if you’re looking for luxury – something that Hong Kong’s hoteliers do extremely well.

    The Peninsula Hong Kong

    Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    The huge Peninsula is one of Hong Kong’s most glamorous hotels and is unusually spacious.

    Mandarin Oriental Hong Kong

    5 Connaught Road, Hong Kong Island
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    Ultra luxurious with a spa, large well-appointed rooms and a very central location.

    The Mira Hong Kong

    118 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Edward Snowden’s bolthole of choice is modern, stylish and conveniently located.

    Butterfly Hotel

    33 King's Road, Causeway Bay
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Close to the shops and restaurants of Causeway Bay, the Butterfly is nevertheless an intimate boutique sleeping spot.

    Bishop Lei International House

    4 Robinson Road, Mid-Levels
    Hong Kong
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Cheap

    The rooms are tiny but the views over Victoria Harbour are sensational.

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Monday, 24.11.2014 10:00

    partly cloudy

    temperature


    24°C


    75°F

    wind direction

    wind speed

    4.375 mph

    humidity

    73%

    7 days forecast

    Tuesday

    25.11.2014

    28°C / 22°C

    82°F / 72°F

    Wednesday

    26.11.2014

    27°C / 22°C

    81°F / 72°F

    Thursday

    27.11.2014

    27°C / 22°C

    81°F / 72°F

    Friday

    28.11.2014

    27°C / 22°C

    81°F / 72°F

    Saturday

    29.11.2014

    26°C / 22°C

    79°F / 72°F

    Sunday

    30.11.2014

    24°C / 22°C

    75°F / 72°F

    Monday

    01.12.2014

    23°C / 21°C

    73°F / 70°F

    Climate & best time to visit China

    China’s extreme size means it has a great diversity of climates, but being located entirely in the northern hemisphere means its seasonal timings are broadly comparable to those in Europe and the US.

    The northeast experiences hot and dry summers and bitterly cold harsh winters, with temperatures known to reach as low as -20°C (-4°F). The north and central region has almost continual rainfall, temperate summers reaching 26°C (79°F) and cool winters when temperatures reach 0C (32°F). The southeast region has substantial rainfall, and can be humid, with semi-tropical summer. Temperatures have been known to reach over 40°C (104°F) although this is highly unusual, but during summer temperatures over 30°C (86°F) are the norm. Winters are mild, with lows of around 10°C (50°F) in January and February.

    Central, southern and western China are also susceptible to flooding, and the country is also periodically subject to seismic activity.

    Early autumn around September and October, when temperatures are pleasant and rainfall is low, is generally seen as an optimum time to visit. Spring is also popular, for similar reasons, and the many tourists visit in March or April.

    Be aware that if visiting during Chinese New Year a large number of businesses will be closed and public transport, in particular rail routes, can be enormously busy.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    26 °C

    78.8 °F

    0 °C

    32 °F

    27 °C

    80.6 °F

    2 °C

    35.6 °F

    30 °C

    86 °F

    4 °C

    39.2 °F

    33 °C

    91.4 °F

    9 °C

    48.2 °F

    35 °C

    95 °F

    15 °C

    59 °F

    35 °C

    95 °F

    19 °C

    66.2 °F

    35 °C

    95 °F

    21 °C

    69.8 °F

    36 °C

    96.8 °F

    21 °C

    69.8 °F

    35 °C

    95 °F

    18 °C

    64.4 °F

    34 °C

    93.2 °F

    13 °C

    55.4 °F

    31 °C

    87.8 °F

    6 °C

    42.8 °F

    28 °C

    82.4 °F

    4 °C

    39.2 °F

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    23 mm

    48 mm

    67 mm

    162 mm

    317 mm

    376 mm

    324 mm

    391 mm

    300 mm

    145 mm

    35 mm

    27 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    4 h

    3 h

    3 h

    3 h

    5 h

    5 h

    7 h

    6 h

    6 h

    6 h

    6 h

    5 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    71 %

    78 %

    81 %

    83 %

    83 %

    82 %

    80 %

    81 %

    78 %

    73 %

    69 %

    68 %

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    18 °C

    64.4 °F

    17 °C

    62.6 °F

    18 °C

    64.4 °F

    21 °C

    69.8 °F

    25 °C

    77 °F

    27 °C

    80.6 °F

    27 °C

    80.6 °F

    27 °C

    80.6 °F

    27 °C

    80.6 °F

    26 °C

    78.8 °F

    23 °C

    73.4 °F

    20 °C

    68 °F

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ depositdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan26 °C0 °C18 °C13 °C71 %23 mm44.9 h
    Feb27 °C2 °C18 °C13 °C78 %48 mm53.5 h
    Mar30 °C4 °C21 °C16 °C81 %67 mm63.1 h
    Apr33 °C9 °C24 °C20 °C83 %162 mm83.6 h
    May35 °C15 °C28 °C23 °C83 %317 mm115.0 h
    Jun35 °C19 °C30 °C25 °C82 %376 mm165.4 h
    Jul35 °C21 °C31 °C26 °C80 %324 mm147.5 h
    Aug36 °C21 °C31 °C26 °C81 %391 mm156.7 h
    Sep35 °C18 °C30 °C25 °C78 %300 mm126.1 h
    Oct34 °C13 °C27 °C23 °C73 %145 mm66.3 h
    Nov31 °C6 °C24 °C19 °C69 %35 mm46.1 h
    Dec28 °C4 °C20 °C15 °C68 %27 mm25.9 h
    year36 °C0 °C25 °C20 °C77 %2214 mm1035.3 h
    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone/Mobile Telephone

    Dialing Code: +86

    Telephone

    Public telephones are becoming harder to locate – your best bets are in post offices and at roadside kiosks. There is a three-minute minimum charge for international calls. The cheapest way to call internationally is to buy a pre-paid calling card, available from most convenience stores and in hotels in units of ¥20, 50, 100 and 200. Skype is a further option.

    Mobile Telephone

    China has the most mobile phone users in the world, backed by a very sophisticated mobile communications system that now covers the entire country. Roaming agreements exist with most major international mobile phone companies. Alternatively, you can buy a prepaid GSM SIM card (from China Mobile Ltd stores) that allows you to use your mobile like a local phone with a new number. You’ll need your passport to register.

    Internet

    Internet cafés can be found in most towns and cities, and Wi-Fi is increasingly available at hotels and cafés in Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Tianjin, Hangzhou and other major cities. Access is cheap and usually reliable. The state routinely blocks access to sites run by the banned spiritual movement Falun Gong, rights groups, Western social networking sites and some foreign news organisations. Postings by bloggers are closely monitored.

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Hong Kong

    Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

    Key Areas

    From markets to designer boutiques, Hong Kong is a shopping destination par excellence and there’s no VAT, although international high-street chains such as Zara do tend to hike their prices. Nevertheless, there’s plenty to choose from, whether you head to Mong Kok and its markets or to Causeway Bay’s quirky Chinese shopping malls. Kowloon is the place to go for high-end malls and luxury boutique brands.

    Markets

    The Ladies’ Market is amazing for women’s clothing, while the Bird Market is interesting to say the least.

    Shopping Centres

    Harbour City is home to most of the big designer names, while Hysan Place is great for quirky names.

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    Cultural differences may create misunderstandings between local people and visitors. The Chinese do not usually volunteer information and the visitor is advised to ask questions. Hotels, train dining cars and restaurants often ask for criticisms and suggestions, which are considered seriously. Do not be offended if you are followed by a crowd; this is merely an open interest in visitors who are rare in the remoter provinces. The Chinese are generally reserved in manner, courtesy rather than familiarity being preferred.

    The full title of the country is ‘The People’s Republic of China’, and this should be used in all formal communications. ‘China’ can be used informally, but there should never be any implication that another China exists. Although handshaking may be sufficient, a visitor will frequently be greeted by applause as a sign of welcome. The customary response is to applaud back. Anger, if felt, is expected to be concealed and arguments in public may attract hostile attention.

    In China, the family name is always mentioned first. It is customary to arrive a little early if invited out socially. When dining, guests should wait until their seat is allocated and not begin eating until indicated to do so.

    If using chopsticks, do not position them upright in your rice bowl as the gesture symbolises death. Toasting at a meal is very common, as is the custom of taking a treat when visiting someone’s home, such as fruit, confectionery or a souvenir from a home country. If it is the home of friends or relatives, money may be left for the children.

    If visiting a school or a factory, a gift from the visitor’s home country, particularly something which would be unavailable in China (a text book if visiting a school, for example), would be much appreciated. Stamps are also very popular as gifts, as stamp-collecting is a popular hobby in China. A good gift for an official guide is a Western reference book on China.

    Conservative casual wear is generally acceptable everywhere and revealing clothes should be avoided since they may cause offence. Visitors should avoid expressing political or religious opinions.

    Photography

    Places of historic and scenic interest may be photographed, but permission should be sought before photographing military installations, government buildings or other possibly sensitive subjects.

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 110

    Food & Drink

    All water used for drinking, brushing teeth or freezing should first be boiled or otherwise sterilised. Bottled water, widely and cheaply available, is the most advisable way of getting around this. Be especially careful when eating at small street-side stalls or restaurants where standards of hygiene may not be high. Pork, salad, scallops, snails and mayonnaise may carry increased risk. Vegetables should be cooked and fruit peeled.

    Other Risks

    Vaccinations against tuberculosis and Japanese encephalitis are sometimes advised. Bilharzia (schistosomiasis) is endemic in the central Yangtze river basin. Avoid swimming and paddling in fresh water. Hepatitis E is prevalent in northeastern and northwestern China and hepatitis B is highly endemic. Sporadic outbreaks of avian influenza (bird flu) have resulted in a small number of human deaths. Rabies is present. If bitten, medical advice should be sought immediately. There are occasional outbreaks of dengue fever. In 2010 China lifted its restrictions preventing HIV-infected visitors from travelling there.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Frank Dr. O`Tremba,
    11/F.
    Kaiseng Commercial Centre
    4-6 Hankow Road
    Tsimshatsui
    Kowloon
    Hong Kong
    Tel. +852-2369-3329
    Emergency Tel. (after office hours)
    +852-2810-9718

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.

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