Germany
Login

Unable to login to the Travel Guide. Please go to our homepage to login.

Homepage
Dublin, Templebar, Pub, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide
Sort by category
  • Gut zu wissen
  • Entdecken
  • Genießen
  • Angebote
  • Offers
  • Discover
  • Enjoy
  • Good to know

City map

Quick view

Dublin, Irland, Pub, Guinness, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Best price search

from
Frankfurt - Dublin,
Round-trip flight, 7 days

Top 10 sights

Dublin, Irland, Bücherei, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide

Ireland
General knowledge

Dublin, Irland, Pub, Guinness, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Airport Information

Flughafen, Airport, kontinental, Flotte, Lufthansa, Stadtführer

Nightlife

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Nachtleben, Nightlife

Restaurants

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Restaurants

Calendar of events

Hotel recommendations

Partner offers from

Weather & best time to visit

41°
Friday, 19.12.2014
23:00

Phone calls & Internet

Telefonieren & Internet, Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Door-to-Door Search

Across Europe or across the globe, the Journey Planner delivers door to door instructions on how to get there.

Shopping in Dublin

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

Find rental car

Travel etiquette
How to fit in

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Reise-Etikette, verhalten, Benehmen

Health

Gesundheit, Vorsorge, Risiken vorbeugen, Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Visa & Immigration

Feedback

How do you like our new LH Travel Guide? Tell us what you think!

Getting around Dublin

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, vor Ort unterwegs
Good to know

City map Dublin

Points of interest: Your selected categories
    Show all
    Good to know

    Dublin – a brief overview

    The days pass easily when you’re in Dublin. Ireland’s capital city might not bowl you over with large-scale postcard sights or gleaming skyscrapers, but it’s a place with character and history in spades. It doesn’t take long for visitors to get drawn in to the warren of Liffey-side laneways, green parks and hidden-away squares, and you’ll find plenty to explore along

    the way, from a near-peerless literary heritage to a famously convivial pub scene. There’s a modern sheen to much of the city these days but traditions still run strong, and if you’re embarking on a wider trip around the rest of the country, it’s the ideal place to start.

    Offers
    • Economy
    • Economy
    • Business
    • 8 days
    • 3 days
    • 4 days
    • 5 days
    • 6 days
    • 7 days
    • 8 days
    • 9 days
    • 10 days
    • 11 days
    • 12 days
    • 14 days

    Select travel period

    Mo
    Tu
    We
    Th
    Fr
    Sa
    Su
    <%= price %><%= currency %>
    <%= date %>

    Your choice

    <%= origin %>
    <%= destination %>
    <%= period %>
    <%= flightclass %>
    Round-trip fllight
    1 adult
    from <%= price %><%= currency %>
    Discover

    Top 10 sights in Dublin

    ListMap
    Dublin, Irland, Architektur, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide

    Guinness Storehouse

    St James’s Gate, Dublin 8
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 408 4800
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0930-1900 (Jul-Aug)
    0930-1700 (Sep-Jun)

    A temple to the black stuff, this interactive attraction gives an overview of the production process and the company’s long history – as well as giving you the chance to sample a pint or two.

    Book of Kells

    Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 896 1000
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 0930-1700
    Sun 0930-1630 (May-Sep)
    Mon-Sat 0930-1700
    Sun 1200-1630 (Oct-Apr)

    A ninth-century gospel manuscript located within Trinity College in the heart of town, the Book of Kells forms part of an exhibition that has become one of the best-known attractions in Ireland.

    National Gallery of Ireland

    Merrion Square West, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 661 5133
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Wed, Fri, Sat 0930-1730
    Thurs 0930-2030
    Sun 1200-1730

    Home to the country’s collection of Irish and European art, this free gallery has some excellent examples of Dutch masters and Italian baroque works, as well as paintings by numerous home-grown artists.

    Aquazone at the National Aquatic Centre

    Abbotstown, Dublin 15
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 646 4300
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 1000-2000 (late May-Aug)
    1000-1900 (Sep-May)

    If the weather’s grim, this large water park is a good option for visitors with kids in tow. It has flumes, a wave pool, a pirate ship and various other features.

    St Patrick’s Cathedral

    Saint Patrick's Close
    Dublin 8
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0900-1700
    Sat-Sun 0900-1800 (Mar-Oct)
    Mon-Sat 0900-1700
    Sun 0900-1430 (Nov-Feb)

    The largest church in Ireland, it dates back to the 13th century in its current form and makes for an imposing place to visit, particularly during a choral performance.

    Dublin Zoo

    Phoenix Park, Dublin 8
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 474 8900
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0930-1630 (Jan)
    0930-1700 (Feb)
    0930-1800 (Mar-Sep)
    0930-1730 (Oct)
    0930-1600 (Nov-Dec)

    Open for more than 180 years, this large-scale zoo has a good conservation programme and plays home to everything from giraffes and gorillas to elephants and tigers.

    Kilmainham Gaol

    Inchicore Road, Kilmainham, Dublin 8
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 453 5984
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0930-1800 (Apr-Sep)
    Mon-Sat 0930-1730 (Oct-Mar)
    Sunday: 10:00 – 18:00

    A fascinating (if sometimes disturbing) place to visit, this now-abandoned gaol gives good insight into the turmoil that Ireland has gone through in recent centuries. Tours fill up fast at peak times, so don’t leave it too late in the day.

    Dublin Writers Museum

    18 Parnell Square, Dublin 1
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 872 2077
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1100-1700

    Dedicated to the city’s great literary figures, with books, letters and personal items relating to the likes of Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett and James Joyce.

    Old Jameson Distillery

    Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 807 2355
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 0900-1800
    Sun 1000-1800

    An enjoyable port of call for Irish whiskey lovers, with lots of information on the distillation of the famous spirit and a good overview of how it differs from its Scottish and American counterparts.

    National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology

    Kildare Street, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Tel: (01) 677 7444
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tues-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1400-1700

    There’s arguably no better place to delve into the country’s long history than here, with its extensive collection of everything from prehistoric gold artefacts to traditional Celtic artworks.

    Good to know

    Country Information

    Country overview

    Ireland is one of the globe’s most singular travel destinations, a feisty, twinkling country far more famous for the sum of its parts than for any specific sight or attraction. Its landscapes are raw and extraordinary. Its cities are animated and very much its own. Its histories – both ancient and contemporary – are full of tales of adversity and resolve.

    Tying all this together is the Irish character, a mythologised combination of bright-eyed bonhomie and bar-room banter: there’s good reason why the planet’s full of Irish pubs.

    Geography

    The Republic of Ireland lies in the north Atlantic Ocean and is separated from Britain by the Irish Sea to the west. The northeastern part of the island (Northern Ireland) is part of the United Kingdom.

    There are four provinces: Leinster, which covers the eastern portion of the country around Dublin; Munster, which covers the south; Connacht, which covers the west of Ireland; and Ulster, which is predominantly in Northern Ireland but also covers the northern tip of the Republic.

    Ireland has a central plain surrounded by a rim of mountains and hills offering some of the most varied and unspoilt scenery in Europe. Inland you’ll find bogs, moors, forests, lakes, mountains and wetlands. Quiet sandy beaches, semi-tropical bays warmed by the Gulf Stream, and rugged cliffs make up the 5,600km (3,500 miles) of coastline.

    For those who really want to make the most of the coastal scenery (and are keen to see a bit of Northern Ireland too), a full loop of the island – sticking close to the sea at all times – can be done with ease in a couple of weeks.

    Together, the landscape and the offshore waters provide a good habitat for a wide variety of wildlife.

    Seals and dolphins are spotted regularly, while the Cork coast even offers the chance to whale-watch over the summer months.

    There are numerous rivers in Ireland, the longest of which – the River Shannon, at 360 km (224 miles) in length – is also seen as one of the country’s most picturesque. Other notable waterways include the River Liffey, which flows from the Wicklow Mountains to the Irish Sea, through the centre of Dublin.

    General knowledge

    Key facts

    Population: 4775982

    Population Density (per sq km): 68

    Capital: Dublin.

    Language

    Irish (Gaelic) is the official language. Estimates vary on the number of people who genuinely speak it as a first language (somewhere between 50,000 and 100,000), but English is the language of the majority.

    Currency

    Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 cents.

    Electricity

    220 volts AC, 50Hz. Three-pin plugs are in use.

    General business opening hours

    Mon-Fri 0900-1700/1800.

    Public holidays

    Below are listed Public Holidays for the January 2014-December 2015 period.

    2014

    New Year’s Day: 01. January 2014
    St Patrick’s Day: 17. March 2014
    Easter Monday: 21. April 2014
    Bank Holiday: 05. May 2014
    Bank Holiday: 02. June 2014
    Bank Holiday: 04. August 2014
    Bank Holiday: 25. October 2014
    Christmas Day: 25. December 2014
    St Stephen’s Day: 26. December 2014

    2015

    New Year’s Day: 01. January 2015
    St Patrick’s Day: 17. March 2015
    Easter Monday: 06. April 2015
    Bank Holiday: 04. May 2015
    Bank Holiday: 01. June 2015
    Bank Holiday: 03. August 2015
    Bank Holiday: 26. October 2015
    Christmas Day: 25. December 2015
    St Stephen’s Day: 26. December 2015

    Enjoy

    Nightlife in Dublin

    ListMap

    A trip to Dublin has always been as much about enjoying the nights as the days, but there’s more on offer than the city’s famous pubs, with some excellent cafés, arts venues and nightclubs to complement the Guinness snugs.

    A trip to Dublin has always been as much about enjoying the nights as the days, but there’s more on offer than the city’s famous pubs, with some excellent cafés, arts venues and nightclubs to complement the Guinness snugs.

    4 Dame Lane

    Dame Lane, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    A laid-back, fashionable DJ bar with a busy roster of events.

    The Cobblestone

    77 King Street North, Dublin 7
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    One of the city’s more traditional pubs, and a good place to catch live music.

    The Church

    Junction of Mary Street and Jervis Street, Dublin 1
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    An old church reinvented as a café, bar, restaurant and nightclub.

    Café en Seine

    40 Dawson Street, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    An atmospheric café bar with décor inspired by 19th-century Paris.

    The Palace Bar

    21 Fleet Street, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Open since 1823 and decked out in mahogany, this is one of the most enjoyable of the city centre pubs.

    Enjoy

    Restaurants in Dublin

    ListMap

    Dublin’s food scene is today one of its most obvious assets, with a whole slew of fresh and innovative options to choose from.

    Quality Irish produce figures large, but there are some fine international restaurants too.

    Coppinger Row

    Off South William Street, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    Serves up simple Mediterranean food in the city centre, and has a good cocktail list.

    Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud

    21 Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    The country’s only two-Michelin-starred restaurant – book well in advance.

    Pig’s Ear

    4 Nassau Street, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    A good place to try classic Irish food with a contemporary twist.

    Hugo’s

    6 Merrion Row, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    A classy, enjoyable restaurant with more than 40 wines by the glass.

    Jo’Burger

    4/5 Castle Market, Dublin 2
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    Fast food with a difference, producing what many consider to be Dublin’s best burgers.

    Discover

    Calendar of events

    The Liffey Swim

    23 August 2014

    Venue: River Liffey.

    Since 1920, spectators turn out to watch swimmers race in the River Liffey from Rory O’More Bridge to the Custom House. Over 250 men and 100 women swim in the historic race, with the Liffey Boardwalk providing a great viewing point.

    Dublin Fringe Festival

    5 – 20 September 2014
    Website

    Venue: Various venues in Dublin.

    Ireland’s largest festival for the performing arts has grown from its modest beginnings in 1995 to become one of the city’s best-loved events. It now puts on about 750 performances in 30 venues throughout the city in places as diverse as St Stephen’s Green and Mounjoy Prison as well as a variety of pubs and smaller venues. The festival aims to deliver a programme of ‘fantastic, beautiful, exciting, head-bending live performances’ in the fields of modern theatre, dance, comedy and visual arts. Total audiences exceed 45,000 in what has become a festival of international importance.

    Dublin Theatre Festival

    25 September – 12 October 2014
    Website

    Venue: Various Dublin theatres.

    The best time to experience Dublin’s many theatres is during the city’s annual October Theatre Festival. The programme promises ‘a bold, diverse, and entertaining international programme, with dominant themes of passion, politics, and betrayal’. For 16 days, stages across Dublin come alive with a range of productions ranging from puppetry to live theatre. As well as plenty of home-grown talent, visitors have the opportunity to see acts from all corners of the world.

    Dublin City Marathon

    27 October 2014
    Website

    Venue: Streets of Dublin.

    More than 10,000 runners have participated over recent years in the Adidas Dublin City Marathon. The 42.2km (26.2 miles) race starts at Baggot Street and finishes in Merrion Square West, both near the city centre. The route passes through many of Dublin’s most historic Georgian streets, with Trinity College, Herbert Park, St Stephens Green and Phoenix Park among the highlights of a mainly flat single-lap course. Thousands of spectators line the route to watch the race and cheer on the runners. The winners receive the Noel Carroll Memorial Trophy, while all those that cross the finish line get an engraved medal and a commemorative marathon T-shirt. The day before the marathon an International Breakfast race is run to welcome overseas athletes with traditional Irish music.

    Samhain Halloween Festival

    31 October 2014

    Venue: Venues throughout the city.

    One of the city’s few genuinely Celtic traditions, with parties and celebrations climaxing in fireworks and a thrilling night-time procession of witches, devils, druids and dragons.

    Leopardstown Races

    26 – 29 December 2014
    Website

    Venue: Leopardstown Racecourse.

    The Christmas Festival is one of the annual horse-racing highlights of Dublin’s prestigious racecourse, attracting riders from around Europe.

    Temple Bar Trad - Irish Music and Culture Festival

    28 – 1 January 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues and locations around Temple Bar.

    This is Dublin’s premier celebration of traditional Irish music and culture. For five days and nights, Temple Bar in the heart of the city, comes alive to the sound of jigs and reels from the many pubs and cultural centres in the area. Nowhere else in the city do audiences get the chance to see masters of the tradition perform up close in small intimate venues. With live music concerts, pub sessions, workshops, children’s events, festival club and much much more, prepare for a barrage of flutes, accordions, bodhráns, mighty sessions and great craic.

    Six Nations Rugby Tournament

    1 February – 21 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Croke Park (home games only).

    The Irish rugby team takes on England, Wales, Scotland, France and Italy in a series of games.

    Dine in Dublin Restaurant Week

    23 February – 1 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues.

    Intended to showcase Dublin’s fantastic eateries, this week-long event includes special offers for diners, a unique mix of demonstrations, competitions, prosecco evenings, wine-tastings, trad sessions, belly dancing events, and much more.

    St. Patrick's Day Festival

    14 – 17 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Throughout the city.

    The annual St. Patrick’s Day Festival runs over the course of a three day event. There will be a vibrant selection of live music from home grown talent and visitors can let their feet do the talking at the large Céilí or learn how to pour the perfect pint from the Guinness experts. There will also be family fun, film, sport, comedy and much more.

    Colours Boat Race

    15 March 2015

    Venue: River Liffey.

    A spectacular rowing race on the River Liffey between Trinity College and University College Dublin.

    St Patrick's Day Parade

    17 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues.

    Ireland’s largest street party consists of parades, fireworks, family carnivals, street performances and ceilidh dancing throughout the city in honour of the patron saint of Ireland.

    Jameson Dublin International Film Festival

    19 – 29 March 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues throughout the city.

    A celebration of the best in contemporary world cinema with over 100 film premieres during 10 days.

    Bloomsday Festival

    9 – 16 June 2015
    Website

    Venue: Various venues throughout the city.

    A walk around the city (starting at the James Joyce Centre, 35 North Great George’s Street) in celebration of the life of James Joyce, as part of the annual Dublin Writers’ Festival. The event is named after the main character in Ulysses – Leopold Bloom. Fans of the author dressed in Edwardian costume follow the route around Dublin taken by Bloom and usually have a breakfast of sausages, beans, black and white pudding and toast at some stage along the way. Davy Byrne’s Pub usually figures on the route. Readings and dramastisations from the novel take place, as well as traditional Irish music. Many celebrations are hosted by the James Joyce Centre.

    love:live music

    21 June 2015
    Website

    Venue: Meeting House Square.

    Love:Live Music is Ireland’s celebration of National Music Day each June. Embracing all forms of music, visitors can expect everything from rock and pop to choral music and rhythm and blues. All events are free and open to everyone.

    Dublin Horse Show

    6 – 10 August 2015
    Website

    Venue: RDS Arena.

    A celebration of Ireland’s affinity with the horse, the Dublin Horse Show is something of an institution in the city and is one of the highlights of summer in Dublin. With guests often dressed in their finest suits and dresses, the show is a prestigious affair which sees over 1,400 horses and ponies competing in more than 100 competitions and classes for big prize money. In addition to the many horse displays, visitors are entertained with theatre, live music and magic shows and there is also a shopping area where visitors can pick up a memento of the day. Steeped in tradition, Thursday is usually Ladies’ Day during which a cash prize is awarded to the best dressed lady. Each year, the glittering show attracts over 100,000 visitors from all over the world.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Enjoy

    Hotels in Dublin

    ListMap

    Dublin’s reputation means it draws a lot of business travellers and affluent international tourists,

    so there’s much in the way of high-end accommodation. Mid-range and budget options are also in good supply.

    The Gresham

    23 Upper O’Connell Street, Dublin 1
    Dublin
    Ireland
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Drawing all sort of famous guests over the decades, this is a central four-star hotel.

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Friday, 19.12.2014 23:00

    cloudy

    temperature


    5°C


    41°F

    wind direction

    southwest

    wind speed

    20.625 mph

    humidity

    86%

    7 days forecast

    Saturday

    20.12.2014

    8°C / 5°C

    46°F / 41°F

    Sunday

    21.12.2014

    12°C / 6°C

    54°F / 43°F

    Monday

    22.12.2014

    12°C / 10°C

    54°F / 50°F

    Tuesday

    23.12.2014

    11°C / 7°C

    52°F / 45°F

    Wednesday

    24.12.2014

    8°C / 6°C

    46°F / 43°F

    Thursday

    25.12.2014

    8°C / 4°C

    46°F / 39°F

    Friday

    26.12.2014

    5°C / 1°C

    41°F / 34°F

    Climate and best time to visit Dublin

    Dublin being where it is, the city experiences little in the way of temperature extremes. That said, its east coast location means it generally enjoys better weather than cities on the west coast – there’s a good chance of sunshine from May to August. Climate aside, however, this is somewhere with a huge number of festivals and events, and key times to be in town include St Patrick’s Day (taking place each 17 March) and ‘Festival Season’, a diverse programme of events which incorporates everything from a fringe festival to a Bram Stoker celebration and runs throughout September and October.

    Climate & best time to visit Ireland

    Ireland’s relatively temperate climate is due to mild southwesterly winds and the effects of the Atlantic Gulf Stream. Summers are warm – only rarely getting unpleasantly hot – while temperatures during winter are much cooler, although it’s far from common for the temperature to drop below freezing and snowfall is rare. Spring and autumn are very mild, with rainfall expected all year round.

    The other chief characteristic of the climate, however, is its unpredictability. You might be basking in balmy T-shirt weather one week, then wrapping up to stave off the chill the next – all the while with an umbrella to hand.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    16 °C

    60.8 °F

    -12 °C

    10.4 °F

    16 °C

    60.8 °F

    -10 °C

    14 °F

    23 °C

    73.4 °F

    -9 °C

    15.8 °F

    22 °C

    71.6 °F

    -6 °C

    21.2 °F

    26 °C

    78.8 °F

    -5 °C

    23 °F

    28 °C

    82.4 °F

    0 °C

    32 °F

    30 °C

    86 °F

    2 °C

    35.6 °F

    28 °C

    82.4 °F

    2 °C

    35.6 °F

    26 °C

    78.8 °F

    -1 °C

    30.2 °F

    24 °C

    75.2 °F

    -5 °C

    23 °F

    19 °C

    66.2 °F

    -6 °C

    21.2 °F

    17 °C

    62.6 °F

    -13 °C

    8.6 °F

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    69 mm

    50 mm

    53 mm

    51 mm

    55 mm

    56 mm

    50 mm

    71 mm

    66 mm

    70 mm

    64 mm

    76 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    2 h

    2 h

    3 h

    5 h

    6 h

    6 h

    5 h

    5 h

    4 h

    3 h

    2 h

    1 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    86 %

    85 %

    84 %

    78 %

    76 %

    76 %

    80 %

    82 %

    84 %

    86 %

    88 %

    86 %

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    9 °C

    48.2 °F

    8 °C

    46.4 °F

    7 °C

    44.6 °F

    8 °C

    46.4 °F

    9 °C

    48.2 °F

    11 °C

    51.8 °F

    13 °C

    55.4 °F

    14 °C

    57.2 °F

    14 °C

    57.2 °F

    13 °C

    55.4 °F

    12 °C

    53.6 °F

    10 °C

    50 °F

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ depositdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan16 °C-12 °C7 °C2 °C86 %69 mm12.22.0 h
    Feb16 °C-10 °C7 °C2 °C85 %50 mm102.6 h
    Mar23 °C-9 °C9 °C3 °C84 %53 mm10.23.5 h
    Apr22 °C-6 °C11 °C4 °C78 %51 mm105.3 h
    May26 °C-5 °C14 °C6 °C76 %55 mm11.26.5 h
    Jun28 °C0 °C17 °C9 °C76 %56 mm106.1 h
    Jul30 °C2 °C18 °C11 °C80 %50 mm10.25.4 h
    Aug28 °C2 °C18 °C11 °C82 %71 mm11.45.0 h
    Sep26 °C-1 °C16 °C9 °C84 %66 mm10.84.3 h
    Oct24 °C-5 °C13 °C7 °C86 %70 mm10.63.3 h
    Nov19 °C-6 °C9 °C4 °C88 %64 mm11.42.2 h
    Dec17 °C-13 °C8 °C3 °C86 %76 mm12.81.7 h
    year30 °C-13 °C12 °C6 °C83 %731 mm130.84.0 h
    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone/Mobile Telephone

    Dialing Code: +353

    Telephone

    Public payphones are still found in major towns and cities, but widespread mobile usage means these are becoming less common. Private payphones can sometimes be found in hostels, bars and internet cafes. It’s advisable to use a pre-paid phone card where possible.

    Mobile Telephone

    Roaming agreements exist with a broad range of international mobile phone carriers, and coverage is good.

    Internet

    Internet is readily available, and internet cafés exist in nearly every town.

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Dublin

    Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

    Key Areas

    Central Dublin is full of shops and stores, a lot of them aimed squarely at tourists, but you’ll find some good outlets on Grafton Street and its surrounding lanes. North of the Liffey, O’Connell Street and Henry Street both offer plenty in the way of high-street names.

    Markets

    Dublin has markets by the dozen. Among the best – and most central – are the Temple Bar Food Market, which runs at weekends, the Ha-Penny Flea Market (Lower Liffey Street), which takes place each Saturday, and the Moore Street Market, which gives a blast of daily Dublin life six days a week.

    Shopping Centres

    Good malls to try include Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre (Stephen’s Green West), which has more than 100 outlets in the city centre, and the Blanchardstown Centre in the northwest suburbs, where you’ll find more than 180 stores and 25 restaurants, as well as three nearby retail parks.

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    The Irish are renowned as an affable, easy-going people, whose conversation is liberally dosed with humour, irreverence and – if you listen carefully – a beal bocht, an Irish expression that translates as ‘the poor mouth’. It refers to a kind of modesty where the speaker is careful to talk themselves down and never reveal how well he or she is actually doing. In short, the Irish don’t really like a show-off.

    Arguably the best place to observe and engage with the Irish is in the pub, still a centre of social interaction in Ireland, especially in smaller communities throughout the country.

    A meal in an Irish home is usually a substantial affair and guests will eat well. Dinner is the main meal of the day and is now eaten in the evening. Casual dress is widely acceptable, but people will often dress up for smart restaurants and social functions. Handshaking is usual, and modes of address will often be informal. Smoking is banned in all public enclosed/working spaces, including pubs, bars and restaurants.

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 112

    Food & Drink

    Levels of hygiene are of a high standard in Ireland, so travellers should only take precautions that they would do in any other developed country. There’s no more danger of being served contaminated or undercooked food in Ireland than anywhere else. A statutory, independent, science-based body, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, is tasked “to take all reasonable steps to ensure that food produced, distributed or marketed in the State meets the highest standards of food safety and hygiene reasonably available.” The only real problems posed by the local food and drink are mild stomach complaints resulting from overindulgence. As in any other country, junk food and fast food isn’t hard to come by. An over-reliance on fish and chips or the omnipresent “fry” (heaped breakfasts of bacon, fried eggs, black pudding, white pudding and so on) isn’t recommended.

    Tap water is generally fine to drink, although stories in recent years have suggested that in some areas the levels of fluoride might be risky, particularly to bottle-fed babies. Bottled water is readily available. And while it might be novel to be sampling Guinness in its home country, being in Ireland by no means makes you immune from crippling hangovers and related after-effects.

    Other Risks

    Ireland is not a risky destination in which to travel. A lack of temperature extremes means that sunstroke is rarely a problem, although you should be aware that summer temperatures can occasionally reach well over 25°C. In these cases, the usual precautions apply: use a generous amount of sunscreen and be sensible about how long you spend in direct sunlight. Be aware that a breezy day can sometimes mask high temperatures.

    Hikers or cyclists travelling over long distances are perhaps the most at risk from the weather, good or bad. In warm weather it’s advisable to drink – and carry – plenty of water and wear appropriate clothing, including headwear. In bad weather, have waterproof clothing to hand and, if possible, inform others where you’re intending to travel.

    Blisters can be another problem for hikers. These can often occur if new walking shoes are being worn across a long distance. Ideally footwear should be worn in before the trip.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Michele Dr. Caraher
    53 Kilbarrack Rd.
    Dublin 5
    Ireland
    Tel. +353-1-8323921

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.
    Good to know

    Getting around

    Public Transport

    It’s not hard to get around Dublin by public transport – a tram system (known as LUAS), an electric rail network (known as DART) and a range of bus options make it straightforward to take in the main attractions. The city centre is compact, so getting around on foot is a realistic option too.

    Taxis

    Taxis can be hailed in the street, found at ranks or booked by phone. The main ranks in the city centre are to be found on O’Connell Street and College Green. Companies to call include NRC Taxis (tel: (01) 677 2222) and KCR Taxis (tel: (01) 492 2233).

    Follow Lufthansa